A FLURRY OF BILLS FOLLOWED LARRY NASSAR’S CONVICTION. HERE’S WHY THAT’S A PROBLEM.

A FLURRY OF BILLS FOLLOWED LARRY NASSAR’S CONVICTION. HERE’S WHY THAT’S A PROBLEM.

“The injustice in many of the laws involving sex or sex-related offenses is that they are passed without debate,” said Lawrence A. Dubin, a law professor at the University of Detroit Mercy, “without an examination of the underlying data that would show their ineffectiveness in accomplishing their intended goals and in creating people as monsters who are often not dangerous to anyone.” The Senate Judiciary Committee approved its bills in just one day. House hearings, which are already underway, are planned to go on for a number of weeks but the package is expected to easily pass.

Read More

Response to: Say no to restorative justice for sex offenders

Response to: Say no to restorative justice for sex offenders

Michael Dolce, in an opinion published for the Hill, argues restorative justice is “horribly insufficient for handling sexual abuse but, in many cases, actually serves to leave an offender free to offend again.” Dolce’s argument evokes a “tough on crime” rhetoric, which is not only patently misleading but grossly capitalizes on fear-based responses to sex offenses. Other than perpetuating unfounded conventions, Dolce’s most egregious mistake is his failure to account for the nuances of sex offending.

Read More